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Man Killed by Stephen's Banded Snake



Craig Adams - Friday, March 15, 2013

Regrettably there have been a number of serious bites from these lesser known snakes in recent times.  The Stephen's Banded Snake is a mostly nocturnal tree dwelling species.  They are seldom encountered tending to remain hidden away in tree hollows, cracks and beneath bark, unless, however, they are displaced by land clearing and flooding events. 
This is a very pugnacious species, and along with others from the same genus including the Pale headed snake and the Broad headed snake, will not hesitate to bite if disturbed.  People should use extreme caution on encountering any snake as this group of snakes is easily mistaken to be a “harmless” species.  Note the following article incorrectly refers to it as the Stephen's Banded python(?) snake.  

Flood rescue victim dies after snake bite

Coffs Harbour Express Advocate
13th Mar 2013 

The Stephen's Banded python snake.

A KALANG man bitten by a highly venomous snake while isolated recently by floodwaters has died.
Bradley Hicks, 60, was transferred to John Hunter Hospital after being bitten by a Stephen's Banded python snake on March 3.
At the time the popular community member was left stranded by fast flowing flood waters while difficult terrain and torrential rain hampered efforts by SES and ambulance officers as well as a police rescue team to transport him to hospital to receive much needed assistance.
Attempts were made to task an air ambulance or helicopter to the scene but poor weather conditions prevented a rescue mission by air.
A funeral service is being held at Glennifer Community Church on Monday.


About the Author - Craig Adams

Craig is a venomous snake expert and former Operations Manager for the Australian Reptile Park. With his wife Jackie, Craig has travelled to remote areas of Australia in search of venomous snakes and spiders for inclusion in the Reptile Park's venom collection program for scientific purposes and for the collection of new data on endangered species. Craig has featured in numerous National Geographic and Discovery Channel programs on the world's most venomous creatures. He worked alongside Steve Irwin as a consultant on his film "Oceans' Deadliest" and continues to work periodically with Steve's best friend John Stainton in an advisory and "to camera" role. Together with Jackie, he has also starred in numerous other television, print media and documentary films and is acknowledged by his peers as the "go to" person in this field.


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